HESO Magazine

Photography, Music, Film, Hitchhiking, Craft Beer – Cultural Pugilist

Author: George Bull

Beardyman - The Interview - HESO Magazine

BeardyMan – The Interview

Beardyman in Bern by Beard Radio on Mixcloud

Beardyman - The Interview - HESO Magazine

Beardyman Beatboxing live

The two-time UK Beatbox Champion takes time out of his packed schedule to tell Heso Magazine about the inspirational genius of Bach and recording his solo album naked while surrounded by monks…

BeardyMan – The Interview

HESO Magazine: Your hometown is Brighton. For the benefit of readers outside England, enlighten us about the little town by the sea that gave us Beardyman…

Beardyman: Brighton is a beautiful little place. Some people call it London-on-sea, but they’re just jealous and overly nostalgic. It’s an awesome place to try and make it in music. True, it’s almost as expensive as London to live there, but the character of the place is still as hippy-like and alternative as ever. It’s got so much character. And it’s just the right size that you’ve got loads of students and young people who love music and like being entertained, but still small enough to make a name for yourself with a couple of years worth of good gigs. For people putting on their own nights there are places to start out—less than there were, but still places. It’s much less harsh than London in terms of attitude. If living in London makes you crazy, Brighton is the antidote. It’s chill. I love it.

HM: How did you get into beatboxing?

BM: I’ve always done it, since I can remember, but I didn’t know there was a name for it, let alone that you could make a living from it. Soon as I saw Rahzel though, I knew I had to give it a shot. That was in 2003 I think…I saw him rock a crowd for a whole hour, and just thought, wicked, I wanna do that! So I teamed up with Klumzy-tung, a ridiculous freestyle MC, and we just started seeing how silly we could be. We developed our own style of “silliness” mixed with hip-hop and drum n bass, and that showed me how silly you could be and get away with it. Since then I haven’t been afraid to be stupid on stage.

HM: When did you decide to commit to being a full-time beatboxer?

BM: It was a decision I took about two years ago. I hit a crossroads, where I could either try and be a musical artist or not sacrifice my degree and possibly my career in product design. It was the best decision I’ve ever made. I thought I’d starve, but actually I’m doing OK. For now…haha!

HM: Who are your biggest influences?

BM: So many people inspire me: Jimi Hendrix, for his improvisational and technical genius; Bach for being able to play a six part fugue with two hands and one brain and improvise the whole thing, which is a bit like playing six games of chess blindfolded. Bobby McFerrin for his incredible vocal accuracy and ability to control an audience to such an extent that he can play them like a keyboard with his feet. There’s this clip of him at the Montreaux Jazz Festival doing it. It’s required viewing for any live musician. Rahzel and all beatboxers worldwide – I’m fascinated by stagecraft, and every beatboxer has their own style of theatre that they bring to a performance. James Brown, Tool, Tim Exile. Tim Exile’s amazing! He regularly clears rooms because his sets are so scary. I love him.

HM: Your live performances are packed full of musical and mimical creativity. Where does your inspiration come from?

BM: Anything really. Whatever makes me laugh, or whatever I’m having a joke about with my mates. You’ve got to check out the Lyrebird of Southern Australia. It’s the best mimic in all creation. It could take any beatboxer down, I’m not even joking. Check it out on YouTube – it’ll fuck your head up. It makes parrots look like amateurs. There’s a quote for you…”Parrots are fucking amateurs!”

Beardyman - The Interview - HESO Magazine

Beardyman getting the crowd going

HM: When you’re up on stage how much is improvisation? How do you prepare before a show?

BM: It’s a mixture depending on the show. I practice routines but I always end up changing them on the day because every crowd is different and you gotta roll with whatever vibe is flowing. It’s pretty cool being able to just adapt a set to do whatever you feel like doing. That’s the advantage of making all the music at the same time with your mouth.

HM: You have a lot of collaborations in the pipeline at the moment. What should we be looking out for this year?

BM: I’m going to be cutting down on gigs in a big way this next 6 months. I need to get this album recorded. I’m doing a freestyle album with musicians and MCs, a podcast with recorded gig material, a studio album and various other collaborations: one with A-skills, another with the Quemists, and many others this year, some of which are too exciting to talk about… but if they happen, then awesomeness will rain down from on high and bless all da people dem!

Also though, and most excitingly, the club-night run by myself and JFB, the UK DMC champion, is going from strength to strength. We have a club night in Brighton and in London, both in excellent venues and at both of them we have complete artistic license. JFB scratches with sounds he’s recorded and we make the entire set out of that. It’s really quite unique—come see it before it gets too big and we’re packing out stadiums!

HM: What can we expect from a Beardyman solo album?

BM: I’m going to record the whole album naked, surrounded by monks of all different faiths. Then I will throw it away and make a new album entirely out of samples of fish being gutted. I’ll release that on a major label under the pseudonym “Robbie Williams” and go on tour with the Royal Philharmonic Orchestra…But really…I’m going to be releasing a couple of different strands of musical recordings: the live improvised stuff, which will be more fun and dance driven, and then there’ll be some slightly deeper, more polished stuff which will be broader in scope and audience. I play instruments too so I’ll be using them. No need to hem in your creativity just to fit into the beatbox mould.

HM: Can we expect to see you out in Japan anytime soon?

BM: Definitely. If someone wants to book me, I’d love to see Japan. I hear the sushi is very good…

Beardyman’s debut EP Mr. Maybe is available from iTunes

Check out Beardyman online:

Scroobius Pip Live in London (George Bull)

Scroobius Pip – The Interview


“They say a picture’s worth a thousand words/ so with this thousand words/ I‘ll paint a picture in your mind that breaks the rule of thirds…” sound the first lines of Scroobius Pip’s album opener “1000 Words”. “Anyone can write a poem if you’ve got something to say,” he says when we meet before one of his recent London shows. Be that as it may, not everyone can stand and deliver like Scroobius Pip. Each time I revisit his self-released debut album No Commercial Breaks, I find a new reason to call everyone I know and tell them to get hold of it. A genuine wordsmith, ladies & gentlemen: this here Scroobius Pip might just be the most refreshingly original artist in the UK at the moment.

Actually, let’s take a long step back…

I meet him at The Pool, a dark lit bar in London’s East end Shoreditch. He’s due to play a gig tonight at the Strongrooms – an intimate affair given the small space, and it’ll just be him and the 6”2 Pianist this eve (Pip beat boxing into a loop peddle with 6”2 adding a rift, then coming in with the vocal) pushing his solo work, no Dan Le Sac with whom the first single “Thou Shalt Always Kill” is due out this month on LEX Records. He arrives just after 8pm clad in his trademark suit, skinny tie, and beard – that looks like it’s there for religious reasons he tells me – “I originally wanted a tight eighties moustache, but Hitler’s really got a captive market with that one.” He asks for a tap water (“very rock n roll, I know,” he says with a smile, sitting down).

Pip’s work is hip-hop, it’s jazz, it’s a cappella, but he is first and last a poet. The name in fact comes from the Edward Lear poem “The Scroobius Pip” – a man himself famous for his often nonsensical poetry. Scroobius himself is excellent company – effortlessly polite yet he’s bursting with enthusiasm and despite his sincere modesty, I’m also struck by a quiet confidence in him. He tells me he doesn’t really get nervous before gigs because his stuff is written as spoken word, to be SPOKEN and so if it’s sitting on the page, it’s not doing what it should be. Like the song “Angles” about a young guy who commits suicide after a run in with a security guard and whose brother then sets out to avenge him – “I wanted to write something that wasn’t just linear narrative, but made the listener respond like a viewer does to scenes in a film, characters expressing different points of view.” Originally recorded with a live jazz band on his solo album, this tune has now been blended with beats from friend Dan Le Sac and it may well prove to be this version that brings his sharp social commentary to a wide audience over the coming year.

He’s eager to talk about his influences and passionate about up and coming British artists he’s into at the moment like Kate Nash and Adele London. Spoken word artist Gil Scott Heron “was a big influence” – Saul Williams and Sage Francis are heroes. The history of this here Scroobius Pip shows a man with fresh ideas, who only a year ago made the decision to get his music out there – “this is still my rookie year.” Having made management at HMV then came decision time: “am I going to just keeping talking about my music or go out there and do it?” So he set off in his 1987 Space Cruiser and toured the country for a month doing street performances. He would check the listings and find out who was playing – people like Mr Scruff, the kind of gigs that would attract people who might appreciate the well-crafted spoken word offerings of Pip. He would just pitch up, set up a mic and give the punters a free gig before they got inside the venue to watch artists that Scroobius himself admired. “I was never a fan of the local band scenario. I didn’t play a gig in my hometown for ages, I wanted to get a genuine reaction on my stuff from people I didn’t know, strangers. First performance ever was outside a Buck 65 gig in Camden – I was outside doing my stuff and giving out flyers. Whatever happens Ill always keep doing spoken word,” he reassures me – “that’s where my roots are.”

Scroobius Pip (George Bull)

Scroobius Pip

Collaboration with Dan Le Sac came about more recently: the pair had known each other for years, though weren’t close mates at the time. Originally both photographers, they shared a big appreciation for underground label LEX Records, so when Dan remixed one of Scroobius’s tracks something clicked. XFM’s John Kennedy and Radio 1’s Rob da Bank picked up the demo for “Thou Shalt Always Kill” and championed it on their shows. The combined radio exposure and build up of public support led to more gigs and eventually the current release. Right now they’re both incredibly excited about forthcoming projects together, as well as the very real possibility of getting signed for an album deal.

“LEX Records was a huge honour. Dan and I both said even if our careers ended tomorrow we would be happy just to be able to hold up the LEX vinyl with our names on it.” In fact Scroobius had originally sent them his individual album – they liked it but didn’t think it was right for LEX. For now he’s putting a hold on his solo material, though it isn’t a case of this being separate to his work with Dan, there are certainly crossovers and he just focuses on whatever side of things are exciting him most at the time – and right now it’s the stuff with Le Sac: “We have an album worth. And we’re working fast – the buzz we’re getting from it all at the moment we could probably put it together in a couple of weeks given the chance!” For “Thou Shalt Always Kill” –Dan sent him the beats and he adapted a poem he had half written, recorded the vocal and sent it back within the hour. “It’s a list poem so it’s easy for people to get straight into it.” A list of commandments as an antidote for the wounds of a generation fed on tabloid news and the guns, bitches and bling scenario. They’d love to release another favourite live track – “Letter from God” using Radiohead’s “Planet Telex”, but that really depends on Radiohead. The pair want to be respectful and have stopped it from playing on the radio until they can approach the band for permission.

Our interview wraps up after 40 minutes or so and he asks if I’m going to come down to his show at the Shoreditch Strongrooms. I accept and head down. The little bar, it reminds me of poetry reading – and there’s Scroobius in the corner talking to the 6”2 pianist, bowling past, excited that all the artists and friends he’s mentioned during the evening are here to see him play “See, people will go anywhere for a free gig” he says, smiling.

To check out Dan le Sac Vs. Scroobius Pip, this summer’s British Festival Goers would be wise to hit Bestival 2007 on the Isle of White.

  • Thou Shalt Always Kill by Dan Le Sac Vs Scroobius Pip is available to download from ITunes now and on 7” from LEX Records.
  • To listen to Angles and Letter From God check out www.myspace.com/danlesacvsscroobiuspip
  • Scroobius Pip’s solo album No Commercial Breaks is available via www.scroobiuspip.co.uk

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