HESO Magazine

Photography, Music, Film, Hitchhiking, Craft Beer – Cultural Pugilist

Tag: HESO Photo of the Week (Page 1 of 2)

Hamburg Fog - Jon Ellis©

Hamburg Fog – Jon Ellis

Hamburg Fog - Jon Ellis©

Hamburg Fog – Jon Ellis©

This, from Jon Ellis of It’ll All End In Tears, his second Photo of the Week, is excellent. Previous work viewable here and especially here. Tschus.

Modern Japan with the Pinhole Holga

Modern Japan with the Pinhole Holga

In part VII of the series Manny Santiago looks at Modern Japan via the Pinhole Holga Panoramic. Generally available in the 120 and 35mm format, Holga pinholes have essentially the same bodies with the lens replaced by a pinhole. This lensless body produces infinite depth of field, meaning everything in the scene will be reasonably in focus.

The family of pinhole cameras has a base of the Holga 120PC without the lens while the Holga WPC (Wide Angle Panoramic) shoots 120 film in unique panoramic sizes; either 6x9cm or 6x12cm format for a super wide angle view. There is the Holga 135PC, modeled after the Holga 135mm camera and there is the Holga 3D Stereo Pinhole camera which shoots two pinhole images per shutter for dual side by side images. These images can then be mounted to view in 3D with a 3D viewer.

The basic principle of pinhole photography is that light passes through a pinhole rather than a lens to expose the film directly. The image on the film will be reversed but the advantage is there is no optical distortion so there is no need to focus and the angle of view is much greater.

Both a tripod and cable release are necessary for use with pinhole photography due to increased exposure times. Since there are no standard exposure times for pinhole photography, all approximate exposure times are to be used as a starting point. The key is to bracket.

HOLGA WPC & 3D PC f/135
Sunny – ½ sec.
Overcast – 2 sec.
Sunrise/Sunset – 18+ sec

Modern Japan with the Pinhole Holga

The Modern Japan Gallery

Dunja Evers "Inside Out" Exhibition at Osaka Baikado

Dunja Evers Inside Out

Dunja Evers "Inside Out" Exhibition at Osaka Baikado

Dunja Evers “Inside Out” Exhibition at Osaka Baikado

Dunja Evers, from Hamburg, studied under Arnulf Rainer at the Academy of Fine Arts in Vienna before bouncing about Marseille and Berlin during the 1980s, publishing series of films and photographs. She moved to Dusseldorf in 1995, where she began lecturing at Technische Universität Dortmund, before acting as visiting professor of photography at the University of California at Santa Barbara, and Rochester Institute of Technology. Recent work includes her “The Third Eye” series and “First Light” video installation.

Sun 13:00 to 20:00 (Mon) ~ Sun (Sat) 30 June – 16 July 2012
Performance by Yangjah 17:00 (Sat) 30 June ※ Opening Party (No Cover)

FLAG Art Exchange | Osaka Dusseldorf

Dunja Evers
Baikado

Modern Japan with a Makina

Modern Japan with a Makina

In part VI of the series Manny Santiago looks at Modern Japan with a Plaubel Makina, a series of medium format press cameras with leaf shutters and rangefinder focusing with collapsible bellows. The original Makina was manufactured by Plaubel & Co. in Germany from 1912 to 1953. Plaubel was later sold to Doi Group, which designed new Makina cameras that sold from 1978 to the 1980s. The Japanese-made Plaubel Makina was a major redesign with Nikkor lenses and integrated metering. It was manufactured first by Copal and later by Mamiya.

Models 67 and 670 have Nikkor 80mm f/2.8 lenses. Both models take ten 6×7cm exposures on 120 rollfilm, while the 670 model also accepts 220 rollfilm (20 exposures per roll). Model W67 is similar to the 670 model, but with a wide-angle Nikkor 55 mm lens (roughly equivalent to a 28 mm lens in 135 format). The 55 mm was considered one of the sharpest and most flare-free of any produced during the analogue photography era. The 69W Proshift has a 47 mm Schneider Super-Angulon and makes eight 6×9cm exposures per roll of 120 film. The lens is mounted on a sliding flange which allowed for perspective control in the same manner as shifting the front standard of view camera.

Modern Japan with a Makina

The Modern Japan Gallery

Burn by K_Chico

Burn by K_Chico

Steel guitars, harmonicas, polaroid cameras, lp albums spinning on an old record player. The real meaning of these anachronisms is their irreproducible original–the analogue which has natural equivalent–the real thing. Like your girl: is she a photo fantasy listening to your records in lingerie or is she real?

“Burn”, a smart and edgy new video single that uses the latest in technology to reference the analogue of old cameras and yesterday’s blues by seamlessly blending sound and vision into a modern version more palatable for today’s globetrotting vagabond culture where airmiles are the new currency and thumb drives full of mp3s are the new handshake.

The imagery forces one to think of the inevitable loss of the past, remembered as bordering on an almost treacly nostalgia, yet “Burn”‘s old-timey blues noise is sublime enough to distract us from what is truly being suggested: that everything offered here, both sonically and visually, can be digitally reproduced ad nauseam, including the girl. Since experiencing K_Chico live is the only way to go, those of us living outside that realm of possibility must suffice with the digital representation.

Some Facts:

  • Pre-production – 5 Months
  • Days of shooting photos – 2
  • Total pictures taken – 3072
  • Pictures used in the video – 256
  • Average time of work morphing one scene 6 hours
  • Scenes morphed in total – 108
  • Scenes used in the video – 42
  • Actual videos used in video – 3
  • People on set – 6
ArtPad SF Exhibition 2012 © Misako Inaoka

HESO Photo of the Week Misako Inaoka Exhibition

ArtPad SF Exhibition 2012 © Misako Inaoka

ArtPad SF Exhibition 2012 © Misako Inaoka

Flowers © Misako Inaoka

Flowers © Misako Inaoka

Dear friends and colleagues,

My new work will be at ArtPad SF from Thursday, May 17th through Sunday, May 20th. I hope to see you at the fair.

Also, my first animation piece is in a collaborative show called Broadside Attractions: Vanquished Terrains and is getting lots of great reviews! It is up till May 26th, please visit at:

Intersection for the Arts
SF Chronicle Review
Art Enthusiast
Misako Inaoka Homepage

Petrified Red Flower at steps outside Benzaiten Shrine on Enoshima

HESO Photo of the Week Yuki Aoyama

Petrified Red Flower at steps outside Benzaiten Shrine on Enoshima

Petrified Red Flower at steps outside Benzaiten Shrine on Enoshima

.

“Good Luck today. Say yes to everything. if someone, anyone, even a stranger, asks you to do something (within reason), do it. You can see opportunities come to you, the ones you normally don’t allow to affect you, those are the ones that today you will say yes to. Look at petrified flowers on old shrine steps. Talk to strangers. Take an adventure. You will be surprised.

Your Stomach Will Whisper The Way (HESO Magazine)

HESO Photo of the Week from Patrick Gookin II

Your Stomach Will Whisper The Way (HESO Magazine)

"Your Stomach Will Whisper The Way" Patrick Gookin

Patrick Gookin is a photographer from Los Angeles, CA by way of New Hampshire and Tokyo, collaborating with the poet Gabe Rothschild who writes titles and verses to go along with the images. In his own words, “We try to capture the absurd realities of living, especially those that come along with being an visitor in a foreign land.” See more of their work here.

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