HESO Magazine

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Tag: Japanese Music

Tmymtur - Yusei 湧声

TMYMTUR – Yusei 湧声 – 5000 Gushing Voices

The microscopic particles were developed by myriads of voices. They make you feel the vitality as if lives are flowing over, and after a while, you will realize you are being covered by them, as if sinking into the deep psyche. Then, as if they correlate with the millions of flowing lives and nature in this world, reflecting and blending, we will eventually be touching the shared particles which connect all of us.

–Tmymtur

TMYMTUR – Yusei 湧声 – 5000 Gushing Voices

NOTE:This sample was recorded at 44.1kHz, and therefore is not capable of expressing certain distinctive elements (over 20kHz frequencies) of the work.

Yusei explores creating music in the tradition of a John Cage and Brian Eno android lovechild, digitally enabled to search for the objective “truth” in the depth of ultrasonic sound. But even God knows we need to listen to something in order to hear. Enter Tmymtur (pronunciation: as difficult as the work) and his method of using imperceptible, ultrasonic waves contained within the voice (as well as 4999 accompanying, melded voice tracks) to create a shared musical journey of the imperceptible symphonic whisper.

Released in late 2012, “湧声” was created by using microphones to record over 5000 voices, including inaudible, ultrasonic waves that human ears are incapable of catching evoking sounds of a mostly nonexistent pastoral nature–the flow of the river, wind blowing through trees–effectively relocating the brain to an artificial environment. Earlier this month he constructing a sound system at Asahi Art Square in Osaka that transmitted frequencies over 20kHz (above the audible bandwidth). His hope was to demonstrate a sound-art performance there, to create a “sound space” where people subconsciously felt something, such as everything being connected and shared by the sound creation “湧声” (Read: HESO as in connection). We were able to talk with Tomoya Matsuura of the Osaka-Based ENSL AMDC label representing Tmymtur.

Tmymtur - Yusei 湧声

HESO: How does Tmymtur produce the high-frequency sounds?

Tomoya Matsuura: Tmymtur’s voice contains an ultra-high frequency (super sonic waves) components which has over 20kHz. ※It is analyzed at the Japan acoustic lab.

HESO: Are any musical instruments used at all?

Tomoya: This work is created by Tmymtur’s voice only. Instruments are not used at all.

HESO: Is this analog or digital or both? What recording devices are used?

Tomoya: Digital recorded with ProTools, Live Microphone: MKH8040

HESO: How are the sounds processed?

Tomoya: This work is created to record one voice and one voice and overlap more than 5,000 layers of the voices. Also, to output ingredients of super high frequency contained in the voices, microphones and recorders that can record super high frequency beyond audible range (more than 20kHz) are used to produce at sampling frequency 96kHz/24bit. Effect processing is not daringly employed this time.

HESO: What does 湧声 (yusei) mean?

Tomoya: Yusei is coined from Japanese word, “湧く(gush)” and “声(voice)”. There is a Japanese word “湧水 (Yuu-Sui: Spring water)”. The water from a spring in the mountain makes us relax and might be a sacred space for Japanese people.

Almost inaudible until the four minute mark, the entire 21 minute recording gently ebbed and flowed like a calm sea beneath a new moon. Though at around the ten minute mark, when the track suddenly grows in volume in a very conspicuous manner, my 8 week old daughter started to shuffle and cry in a way very peculiar to her. The 12 year old beagle stretched out next to her on the sofa, however, did not stir from her snoring slumber. There may be something to Tmymtur’s Yusei, and although I can’t hear it, I’m still listening.

Tim & Puma Mimi and the apple

The Stone Collection Of Tim & Puma Mimi

Tim & Puma Mimi and the apple

Tim & Puma Mimi and the apple

As the sparse synthesizer and video games breaks beep to life on the first track of The Stone Collection Of Tim & Puma Mimi we hear a Puma Mimi ask a question, “Acchi, kocchi, acchi, kocchi, dochi ni ikou?” (Here, there, here, there, which way to go?). It is unclear if she’s asking us or herself. And with the range of musical genres represented on the album (hip hop, dance, electronic, J-pop, crossover jazz, fruit), this might be emblematic of the album itself. At its heart, it’s a fun and accessible (even if you don’t speak Japanese) musical metaphor for modern Tokyo living.

Much as the album defies straightforward definition, so too does how Tim and Puma Mimi met (“We met at the Santa Klaus party in the Netherlands in the end of 2003.”), and eventually came to live and make music in Tokyo.

In places it is a throwback album of beautiful voicework and analog instruments, yet its modern synthesizers, canned drumbeats and use of fruit as instrument (what?!) belie the way it was made–not in the studio, but in Puma Mimi’s small 1DK (One Dining Kitchen Apartment) flat in Shinagawa, Tokyo.

HESO: How do you make music? digitally, analoguely, with fresh produce or all of the above?

Tim: All of them, we don’t have rules, how to produce, it just has to bring the song to a cool shape. The cucumber is electronic, the flute acoustic, mostly I use the micro Korg, but sometimes Fender Rhodes or Mini Moog, or even plug-ins, but I don’t like midi.

More than just the multi-instrumentalist genre-mashing, the way the songs are made reflects on the private/personal relationship between life and music, recording and touring, loving and playing. Having met and seen a bright future, both musically and romantically, they soon had to part because of the technicalities of bureaucratic life–visas, work, nationality. But long distance relationshipping didn’t stop them from making music. The Skype concert series soon sprang to life, with Tim touring clubs Europe and skype-casting Mimi singing live from her kitchen in Tokyo. This, plus their growing number of singles, created a following and got them into electro-festivals across Europe. But it wasn’t enough.

HESO: You wrote and recorded your album in Mimi’s tiny Tokyo apartment, but where are you now?

Tim: Now we live in Zurich, bit bigger apartment, but still all instruments in bedroom. It’s in Kreis 4, the melting pot of underground Zurich (yes that exists too in Zurich, beside being a super-expensive and clean old town famed for the Bahnhofstrasse). Sometimes we rent a music-room, but it’s often underground and humid.

Tim & Puma Mimi Live at Womb in Tokyo

Tim & Puma Mimi Live at Womb in Tokyo

HESO: Tim, what is your impression of Japan? Puma Mimi, Switzerland?

Tim: Japan? First I was disappointed, I had a picture of crazy colorful people, but 90% of people in Tokyo wear black suits. But after two weeks you start to understand, why they don’t look into your eyes, that they have different lines to queue for next train. After two months you start to love it, but I’m not sure if I will ever feel at home there.

Mimi: I like Zürich very much because I can get both city and nature life at once. I grew up in the northern part of Japan where I enjoyed nature, but as a teenager, it was boring. No concert places, no exhibitions. Even the last cinema in the town went bankrupt, and turned to be a Karaoke house (yeah! of course we had Karaoke!). Then I went to Tokyo to study when I was 19. Tokyo was so exciting, creative fashion, fast information, music, arts and so on…. I enjoyed it a lot. But sometimes, I couldn’t breathe. I missed nature, fresh air, fresh water, quietness, the sky. Compared to Tokyo, Zürich is very small, but there are many things going on in this “little big city”. Lake water is very clean. And I can get to deep nature in 10 min by train. That’s perfect combination for me. Besides Zürich, I like mountain area in Ticino, old stone houses and sharp mountains. It’s so nice to walk there.

HESO: If your beats and words are inspired by the cramped and crowded Tokyo lifestyle, what happens when you have all of the Alps from which to take inspiration?

Tim: I would love to do calm, maybe even spiritual music, but always when I try it, I think that doesn’t work, audience would fall asleep, or just start talking. I would like to do live music for yoga or something similar.

Mimi:I try to write about something around me. So Alps could be a good inspiration too. But the problem is that the nature is very powerful. So, when I go to mountains, I become wordless. It takes more time to write about the nature than about concrete jungle… at least, for me.

Tim & Puma Mimi on the Phone by David Thayer 2011

Tim & Puma Mimi on the Phone by David Thayer 2011

On the lenitive “Tamago” the album takes a turn from the fun and playfully amateurish upbeat Electro-J-pop to a more serious and contemplative nature. It is not a coincidence that this comes halfway through the Stone Collection. From this point on, especially on “Green Blood Circulation”, even when the music returns to previous form, the songs retain a depth and a progressive movement toward some far-off point that we can’t quite see, but know is out there.

HESO: How do you come up with ideas for songs? Albums? Videos? Live performances? Who does what?

Tim: I produce the songs. Mimi writes texts and melody lines. Musically it’s just trial and error, sometimes it works, sometimes doesn’t. I give the recordings over to Mimi. In a bigger view I would say: The ideas grow in our heads and sometimes we can pick up the fruits. Inspirations are: fleamarkets, walking in cities and mountains, watching concerts, movies, reading books.

Mimi: About lyrics: I try to express my inner feeling by describing daily objects around me. For example, I came up with lines for “Giacometti” when I saw the poster of Giacometti hanging in the room where we were recording. And the text begins with “To talk to Giacometti, I don’t need words….”. Something like that. Melody line: it’s all depends on Tim’s music. When Tim gives me an idea of song, then I listen to it many times and try to jam (hum) with lyrics I already have.

HESO: The album has dropped. What happens next?

Tim: In a week we visit China for 3 weeks, travelling with a bunch of musicians and do live music to silent movies. Later this Year I want to build a do-it yourself-kit of my Fruitilyzer, that people can build their own Fruitilyzer and electrify new fruits and vegetables.

HESO: Can you write a very short song-poem about your favorite food?

Mimi: I wrote this quite long ago, and try to make a song out of it, but Tim never liked my melody lines with these lyrics. So it is still un-published. Tim doesn’t like Tomato Sauce either, by the way.

トマトソース / Tomato sauce
飛び散る飛び散る/ It splashes all over
白いTシャツ / on my white T-shirts
赤いシミ/ and leaves red stains
食べるのやめるか/ Should I stop eating
トマトソース/ Tomato sauce?

いやいやそんな/ Noway, it’s
トマトソース / Tomato sauce!
だってだいすき / I love
トマトソース / Tomato sauce
ファッションは /Fashion has no chance against
食欲に敵わない / appetite

HESO: I love Tomato Sauce. Thanks guys. Check out their site for more fun with fruits and beats.

Interview with Tim & Puma Mimi is part of HESO Magazine’s ongoing (late) Summer Interview Series, where we interview photographers, musicians and artists about their work and what they think about the world of 2012. We may ask them similar questions, but the answers have been anything but the same old canned responses. Check out the entire series here.

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